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Various - Central Javanese Gamelan: Archaic Styles And Austere Performances Of The Early 1970s flac album

Various - Central Javanese Gamelan: Archaic Styles And Austere Performances Of The Early 1970s flac album
  • Performer Various
  • Title Central Javanese Gamelan: Archaic Styles And Austere Performances Of The Early 1970s
  • Date of release 2017
  • Country US
  • Style Gamelan
  • Other formats MMF DXD AAC ASF MP1 VQF MP4
  • Genre World & Folk & Country
  • Size MP3 1936 mb
  • Size FLAC 1801 mb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 705

Gamelan Kyahi Kodok Ngorek. Untraced Composition. A2. –Gamelan Kyahi Sirat Madu. Gending Unduk, Pelog Nem. A3.

Performer: Various Genre: Folk, World, & Country Album: Java Traditional Gamelan Spa Vo. Style: Gamelan. Unknown Artist - Gamelan Semar Pegulingan (Gamelan Of The Love God). Folk, World, & Country. Performer: Unknown Artist Genre: Folk, World, & Country Album: Gamelan Semar Pegulingan (Gamelan Of The Love God) Released: 1972 Style: Gamelan. Music Of The Venerable Dark Cloud - The Javanese Gamelan Khjai Mendung.

Note: the first cover is of the first CD issue of the album, released during the 1990s. Javanese Court Gamelan is a recording of the gamelan of the Paku Alaman court in Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia. It was recorded by ethnomusicologist Robert E. Brown. It was issued on compact disc on April 17, 1991 with the original contents. It was remastered and reissued under the name Java: Court Gamelan on January 28, 2003 with a cover of a photograph of Borobudur.

melodies in Central Javanese gamelan music revealed that the concept of inner. melody still leaves problems unsolved: it has even given rise to new problems. by transcriptions of rebab melodies of the early nineteenth century recorded. in The history of Java by Thomas Stamford Raes (1982:4701). Brinner (1993) has shown, the rebab melodies are very simple, almost as simple.

The word gamelan comes from the low Javanese word gamel, which may refer to a type of mallet used to strike instruments or the act of striking with a mallet. The term karawitan refers to classical gamelan music and performance practice, and comes from the word rawit, meaning 'intricate' or 'finely worked'. The word derives from the Javanese. word of Sanskrit origin, rawit, which refers to the sense of smoothness and elegance idealized in Javanese music. The various archaic ensembles are distinguished by their unique combinations of instruments and possession of obsolete instruments such as the bell-tree (byong) in the 3-toned gamelan kodhok ngorek.

Outside of the main core on Java and Bali, gamelans have spread through migration and cultural interest, new styles sometimes resulting as well.

1 –Gamelan Kyahi Sirat Madu. 2. –Gamelan Kyahi Kanyut Mangkunegaran. 3 –Gamelan Kyahi Gunter Sari. 4 –Gamelan Kyai Surak 5 –Gamelan Tjrabalen 6 –Gamelan Kyahi Kodok Ngorek.

The origins of the gamelan are ancient and mysterious. Apparently gamelan predates the Hindu-Buddhist culture that dominated Indonesia in its earliest records, and instead represents a native art form. The instruments developed into their current form during the Majapahit Empire  . Outside of the main core on Java and Bali, where gamelans have spread through migration and cultural interest, new styles sometimes result as well. It is reserved for the most austere repertoire, typically playing a paraphrase of the balungan.

Gamelan orchestras are integral to the performances of shadow plays (wayang kulit) and court dance, but also perform in concert by themselves. The instruments are created to be played together; since there is no standardized tuning and the pitch of the instruments cannot be changed, each gamelan has a unique sound. Gamelan music reaches its pinnacle in the orchestras attached to the courts of the sultans of Yogyakarta and Surakarta (Solo) in central Java, where they are considered treasures of the realm and an important spiritual resource of the ruler  . This album is one of three recorded in the 1970s presenting the great court gamelans of Solo and Yogyakarta in Central Java, the ground zero of Javanese high culture.

Javanese Gamelan and Its Music. Various subdivisions of the gongan are punctuated by smaller gongs, such as the kenong and kempul. The term ladrang in the title of this piece refers to a composition with a relatively short cycle of thirty-two beats in each gongan, compared to long-form cycles up to 128 beats. Javanese music is also classified according to the scale (laras) and melodic mode (pathet) of each piece. Female vocalists in central Javanese gamelan music are called pesinden. Their melodies draw from melodic formulas enriched with interjections and variations, all leading to the principal notes of each section of the composition. Their lyrics are based on richly allusive couplets of twelve-syllable lines divided into four- and eight-syllable units. It provides evidence of early maritime trade between China and Indonesia. Jar. China, Ming or Qing dynasty, late 16th‒18th century.

Tracklist

Gamelan Kyahi Sirat Madu Gending Unduk, Pelog Nem
Gamelan Kyahi Kanyut Mesem Du Puro Mangkunegaran Gending Tirtakentjana, Pelog Nem
Gamelan Kyahi Gunter Sari Gending Kangsaram; Gending Roning Tawang, Pelog Nem
Gamelan Kyai Surak Gending Uluk Uluk, Slendro Sanga
Gamelan Tjrabalen Untraced Composition
Gamelan Kyahi Kodok Ngorek Untraced Composition

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
none Various Central Javanese Gamelan: Archaic Styles And Austere Performances Of The Early 1970s ‎(CDr, Album, Comp) Not On Label none US Unknown
ES10 Various Central Javanese Gamelan: Archaic Styles And Austere Performances Of The Early 1970s ‎(Cass, Album, Comp, Ltd, RE) Power Moves Library ES10 Canada 2017